Britannia Square House Histories


37 & 35 Britannia Square
by Sheila M Campbell



St. Swithun's Rectory, once 11 Britannia Square, since then Nos. 37 & 35 Albany Terrace.

The house now known as 37, Albany Terrace, was built in 1833 by a Banker so the old home has stood the test of time. The banker began by building the main part of the house, then as his family increased to nine children, he added on what people in the square know as No. 35.

It is a most beautiful Georgian home standing elegantly in an outstandingly well-appointed location. The garden is large, walled, private, and at one time was surrounded by large Elm trees. In Roman times the land on which this house stands was a refuse dump!

The house was never altered from one building. The main house has seven bedrooms, two bathrooms (two en-suite added) a large drawing-room, dining-room, servants’ hall, large kitchen, scullery, butler’s pantry, and cold larder. There is a large cellar, wine cellar, five attics and a stable block – now two garages.

The added part of the house upstairs has a night nursery, & three bedrooms. Downstairs is a school room, Day Nursery, housekeeper's storeroom, office, and kitchen.

This is how the property was when my Grandparents bought it in 1910. They divided the house by closing the doors through to what is now No. 33. There has never been any insulation between the two parts. One of my married aunts lived in the added part, where we are now. i.e. No. 33.

I do not know the name of the Banker builder, but the Needham family lived here before our family moved in, in 1910.
Photographed in 1910

The rooms I have mentioned were as they were until my Aunt inherited the property and since then, altered considerably by the new owner.

I have a long family history of this lovely home - we have been here 105 years and I cannot bear to think of anything happening to it. Quite naturally there are so many happy memories attached to it. My parents' wedding reception was on the lawn of 37, in April 1929. I went to Alice Ottley from here, and on and on the history goes.


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